Taxpayer Bill of Rights (TABOR)

In 1992, TABOR sounded like a good way to curb political waste and limit the growth of government. 26 years later, TABOR limits elected officials’ ability to make investments on behalf of the people. Colorado Springs and El Paso County voters have repeatedly passed measures allowing exceptions to TABOR, and last did so in November 2017 with Issue 2A focused on additional fees to fix the neglected stormwater system (without pulling $17 million out of other city services, such as police and fire). TABOR needs to be repealed and replaced — not so we can spend more, but so the state can make multi-year budget decisions about how to invest our tax dollars in infrastructure, education, and environment to keep Colorado’s strong economy going. Our local economy is still growing, let’s think ahead about tomorrow’s needs. I’ll work to repeal TABOR and craft a more sensible alternative that puts control of taxes and investment back in local control.

 

 

1 – http://gazette.com/colorado-springs-mayor-on-a-winning-streak-asking-voters-for-money/article/1614873
2 – http://gazette.com/article/1614800 ; https://www.denverpost.com/2017/11/07/colorado-springs-stormwater-fee-i-25-results/
Reference: http://www.reporterherald.com/news/colorado/ci_31433166/reflections-25-years-tabor-colorado ; https://www.aspentimes.com/opinion/columns/cary-kennedy-colorado-education-improvements-start-with-reforming-tabor/ ; http://thetaborfoundation.org/ ; https://www.bellpolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Understanding-TABOR.pdf ; http://www.springsgov.com/doccenter/publiccommunication/tabor%20abcs.pdf